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Simple, easy sharbat (drinking sherbet)

24 Apr

Drinking Sherbet

  • Servings: 30 glasses
  • Difficulty: ridiculously simple
  • Print
Ingredients:
* 2 cups icing sugar
* 1 tsp citric acid
* 1 tsp tartaric acid
* 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
* 2 tsp flavourings (optional)
Multicoloured sherbet

It even comes out in pretty colours depending on the flavour

Sometimes (and I’m well aware that this is probably blasphemy) you just don’t want an alcoholic drink. Even the fermented soft drinks have a little alcohol and, frankly, are a bit of a faff if what you want is a glass of something fizzy, refreshing and fruity right about now. Having to brew it all, wait a few days for everything to ferment, refrigerate and then drink it within the next few weeks might just be more than you can be bothered with on a boiling hot day.

I know that occasionally I just want something I can throw in a glass and drink, and since it’s socially unacceptable (apparently) to drink alcohol before eleven in the morning this seems to be the solution. Sharbat (also sherbet, sorbot, and various other corruptions) is basically the old familiar powder that comes in tubes with liquorice, looking like sticks of dynamite. It also works very well stirred into a glass of water to give it a little fizz and flavour. Along with all this it’s very easy to make, will keep forever if kept dry, and is cheap. If you’re not thirsty you can even just eat the powder.

So to the whole making bit. Very simple. Get a big bowl. Put all the ingredients in. Stir together thoroughly. Sieve if you want it to look a little more powdery, but that’s not essential. Store somewhere dry. When you’re ready to use some just drop a couple of spoonfuls into a glass of water, stir, and glug.

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4 Comments

Posted by on April 24, 2014 in Recipe, Soda

 

Tags: , , , ,

4 responses to “Simple, easy sharbat (drinking sherbet)

  1. Sarah Bore

    April 26, 2014 at 10:24 pm

    I have always wondered how sherbert is made. Do you use liquid flavourings? If not, where do you get dry flavourings?

     
    • Old Boar

      April 26, 2014 at 10:33 pm

      The recipes I’ve seen use jelly flavour crystals, liquid flavorings would probably cause the acid and bicarb to react.

       
  2. Sarah Bore

    April 27, 2014 at 7:39 am

    That’s what I thought. Where do you get jelly flavour crystals?

     
    • Old Boar

      April 27, 2014 at 9:15 am

      I mainly get , but apparently some larger supermarkets and health food stores will carry them as well. You just mix the flavourings in with the rest.

       

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